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University of Ottawa - Ophthalmology - Ottawa

2022 R-1 Main Residency Match - first iteration
CMG Stream for CMG

Last approved on February 10, 2022

Summary of changes

Approximate Quota:

 2 

Accreditation status : Accredited

Provincial Criteria


Dr. Chloe Gottlieb
Ophthalmology 
Ottawa Hospital - General Campus  
501 Smyth Road, Box 307
Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6
(613) 737-8899 x79422
(613) 737-8836

Program Contacts

Contact Person
Ginette Snook
Departmental Education Program Coordinator
gsnook@toh.on.ca
613-737-8899 x79422

Dr. Chloe Gottlieb
Program Director
gsnook@toh.on.ca
(613) 737-8899 x79422


Important Information

Please be aware the Ministry of Health has mandated all hospital and health care employers establish, implement and ensure compliance with a mandatory COVID-19 vaccination policy.  The Ministry directive can be reviewed here. Residents matched to any Ontario residency program must ensure they are able to comply with the Ministry directive in order to start training July 1, 2022.  

It is important to understand this is an evolving issue. You are required to review Provincial, Hospital, University and Program information to ensure you are in continued compliance with directives.  

All candidates must meet the Ontario Criteria of Eligibility found here.

MCCQE (Medical Council of Canada qualifying examination) Part 1 results:

Trainees will be required to disclose their MCCQE Part 1 examination results if taken, upon entry into any of the University of Ottawa's training programs. Please note that the MCCQE Part 1 is not a requirement to begin residency. The purpose of this disclosure is to allow for resources to be provided to the few residents who would benefit from extra support early in their residency in an effort to maximize their success.

Failure to meet or provide proof of any of the stated requirements may result in an applicant’s file not being reviewed or removed from the Rank Order List.


General Instructions

Program application language: English

All candidates must meet the Ontario criteria of eligibility.

  • Three separate university-affiliated resident training sites: one community-based comprehensive ophthalmology and surgical training, one clinical and surgical paediatric ophthalmology and one subspecialty medical and surgical teaching hospital.
  • Early surgical exposure, beginning in the PGY-2 year, to ensure that the resident is extremely well trained surgically.
  • A very large volume of both interactive lectures or case reviews and clinical teaching with staff.
  • Large amount of one-on-one teaching allowing residents to interact directly with the comprehensive or subspecialist ophthalmologist.
  • A regular opportunity to delve in a wide variety of research topics.
  • A regular opportunity to attend national and international meetings.
  • A very warm and friendly atmosphere between residents and staff.
  • Very responsive Residency Training Committee set on resolving any personal or academic matters that arise promptly and fairly.
  • The clinical facility and research labs are in very close proximity and thus there is often interaction between PhD researchers, clinicians and residents. This includes work on resident research projects.
  • The University of Ottawa Ophthalmic Surgical Simulation Center provides a non-intimidating, dynamic yet controlled surgical environment. Junior residents meet with a surgical preceptor to refine surgical approaches and techniques. This is a unique feature of our program in Ottawa to recognize the value of early surgical training by creating dedicated surgical training time for PGY-2s. Their experience in the wet lab is coupled with OR time, who works with the residents to translate the skills acquired in the simulation center and apply them to live patient encounters in the operating room. The EYESi Ophthalmic Surgery Simulator (VR Magic), which includes a cataract and vitrectomy training modules is state of the art technology that allow residents the ability to refine many of their surgical skills.
  • Participation in the External Cataract Surgery Skills Courses.
  • Summer clinical skills enhancement course.
  • A resident rotation dedicated to ophthalmic diagnostics.
  • National and International partnerships.
  • Opportunity for residents to participate in refractive surgery. A unique experience among ophthalmology programs.
  • Dedicated research time away from clinical activities.
  • A faculty-run mentorship program matching a resident with a mentor ophthalmologist.
  • A nationally recognized orbital anatomy course for a solid foundation in orbit/oculoplastic and neuro-ophthalmology.
  • Funding opportunities for research and conference presentations.
  • A Resident Wellness Program with a peer support program, expert-led workshops and faculty involvement.
  • A strong Visiting Professor Program with half-day lectures to the residents.


Supporting Documentation

Canadian citizenship
CaRMS partners with third-party organizations to verify your citizenship or permanent resident status. If your status is verified by one of these organizations, you will not need to provide citizenship documents in your application. If your citizenship status is not verified, you must provide one of the documents listed below.
Document must be notarized/certified
Required
Submit one of the following documents to verify your Canadian citizenship:
• Canadian Birth Certificate or Act of Birth
• Certificate of Canadian Citizenship
• Confirmation of Permanent Residence in Canada
• Passport page showing Canadian Citizenship
• Canadian Permanent Resident Card (both sides of card)
• Proof of pending Canadian citizenship / pending permanent residency
• Record of Landing, clearly showing the date of landing in Canada

Proof of legal status must be submitted to CaRMS by the File Review opening deadline. (Photocopies acceptable). No other forms of verification are acceptable.

The following must be accompanied by photo ID; e.g. driver's license, health card, or other government-issued photo I.D.

  • Canadian Birth Certificate or Act of Birth
  • Confirmation of Permanent Residence in Canada
  • Proof of pending Canadian citizenship/pending permanent residency
Language proficiency
Required
Submit one of the following documents to verify your language proficiency:
• Letter of language proficiency

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY APPLIES TO CMG's (Canadian Medical Graduates) only if the Medical Degree language of instruction is in FRENCH.

Proof of language proficiency will also be accepted as follows:

Written attestation from the applicant confirming the ability to work in English, both written and spoken.

Important:  It is at the discretion of the program, who may require further proof of a language test or letter from a school official after File Review has begun.

Reference documents
Required
Number requested: 3
Additional documents
Required
Personal Letter 
Word count
Minimum : None
Maximum : None

The personal letter should not be more than 2 pages, specifically 350-400 words per page.

Custom Résumé / CV 

Medical School Transcript 

Order from your Registrar.

Medical Student Performance Record 

(Dean’s letter) Order from the Undergraduate Office.


Review Process

Applications submitted after file review has opened on January 31, 2022


Supporting documents (excluding letters of reference) that arrive after file review has opened  on  January 31, 2022


Letters of reference that arrive after the unmasking date on January 31, 2022



Interviews

Dates:

  • March 8, 2022
The interviews will be held on Zoom, March 8, 2022.

Program will notify all applicants through CaRMS Online and will send email invitations directly to applicants selected for an interview.
The Resident Selection Committee will review all applications and relevant documents and the top candidates across Canada chosen using the above selection criteria will be invited for interviews. The candidates are to be contacted. We will conduct our interviews by video conferencing; details to follow. 


Selection Criteria

A strong academic record both as an undergraduate and during medical school. Candidates should have demonstrated a strong commitment to ophthalmology. Some of the references must be from academic specialists who knew the candidate during his/her elective. Referees should be able to attest to interest and proficiency in the specialty of ophthalmology and provide comments on interpersonal and organizational skills, medical skills, clinical judgement, reliability and manual dexterity. Candidates should have demonstrated interest and experience in research during their undergraduate or medical school training. The candidate must demonstrate maturity, excellent communication and interpersonal skills, a broad range of extracurricular activities and leadership qualities.

Program goals

These goals and objectives are the minimum requirements to graduate in Ophthalmology following four core years of training. Individual differences in talent and capacity will be recognized. The Department provides training through didactic sessions as well as observation and hands on experience. It is the responsibility of the residents, to take the fullest possible advantage of these opportunities to not only qualify for the examinations, but also to become an accomplished ophthalmologist.

 

Your day-to-day performance in the clinic, rounds, operating room, Journal Club and teaching sessions provides the basis for your evaluations. Mock orals and the examinations throughout the year provide additional opportunities for assessment. 

 

General Goals

 

  1. To produce a high-quality ophthalmologist who can function as a: medical expert, communicator, collaborator, leader, health advocate, scholar and professional.
  2. To provide an opportunity to develop research skills.
  3. To provide an opportunity to develop teaching skills
  4. To provide the basic and clinical knowledge and skills to pass professional examinations in the specialty (Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and American Boards).

Selection process goals

Commitment to ophthalmology. Some of the references must be from academic specialists who knew the candidate during his/her elective. Referees should be able to attest to interest and proficiency in the specialty of ophthalmology and provide comments on interpersonal and organizational skills, medical skills, clinical judgement, reliability and manual dexterity. Candidates should have demonstrated interest and experience in research during their undergraduate or medical school training. The candidate must demonstrate maturity, excellent communication and interpersonal skills, a broad range of extracurricular activities and leadership qualities.

File review process

Review team composition : 3 review teams: each review team has 4 staff members and 1 resident

Average number of applications received by our program in the last five years : 51 - 200

Average percentage of applicants offered interviews : 0 - 25 %

Evaluation criteria :
File component Criteria
CV Summarizes the candidates academic and extra-curricular achievements.
Electives Applicants who have completed a broad range of electives including in our discipline.
Examinations Review performance on exams.
Extra-curricular Interest beyond academics that show interest in self-development and enhance the candidates life skills and maturity.
Leadership skills Academic and extra-curricular involvement that enhances and demonstrates their skills as a leader.
MSPRs Academic, professional conduct, narrative of student's performance on core rotations.
Personal letters Motivation and interest to dedicate their career to our field.
Reference documents Interest and proficiency in the specialty, interpersonal/organizational skills, clinical judgement.
Research/Publications Demonstrate interest and experience in research.
Transcripts Academic performance and success.

Elective criteria

We are looking for and rewarding applicants who have completed a broad range of electives including in our discipline.
We do not require applicants to have done onsite electives.

Interview process

Interview format :



We routinely accommodate requests to re-schedule interviews for applicants due to weather, technology failure or unforeseen circumstances.

Interview evaluation criteria :
Interview components Criteria
Collaboration skills Ability to work effectively with all members of the health care team
Collegiality Establish and maintain positive relationships with other colleagues in the health care team
Communication skills Active listing and good verbal communication that facilitates sharing important information
Health advocacy Responds to an individual patient’s health needs by advocating for the patient
Interest in the discipline Experience in our field such that they know what to expect in the ophthalmology training and career
Interest in the program Demonstrates some knowledge of the unique aspects of the uOttawa program
Leadership skills Demonstrates experience that prepared them to take responsibility for leading the delivery of care
Professionalism High personal standards of behaviour, personal health and high ethical standards in decision making
Scholarly activities Previous academic success that supports a lifelong commitment to excellence in practice
Other interview component(s)  

Information gathered outside of CaRMS application

Specifically, we may consider:







Ranking process

The behavior(s) exhibited below during the interview process may prevent an applicant from being ranked by our program :
   
   
   


Program Highlights

  • Formal Teaching Schedule
    • Academic Half Day Formal Schedule: uOttawa boasts a formal Academic Half Day Teaching Program where the American Academy of Ophthalmology Manuals are covered in completion twice during one's residency. All half-days are taught directly by staff ophthalmologists or visiting professors.
    • Professor Rounds: Twice weekly during the Academic Year, residents receive morning teaching for one hour by staff ophthalmologists covering topics of specific interest as selected by staff or residents. 
    • Journal Clubs & Grand Rounds: In addition, residents attend and present at weekly Grand Rounds and at monthly Journal Clubs with the entire department. 
  • Professor Rounds
    • Twice weekly during the Academic Year, residents receive morning teaching for one hour by staff ophthalmologists covering each sub-specialty area on topics of specific interest as selected by staff or residents.
  • Department Journal Clubs & Grand Rounds
    • Residents attend and present at weekly Grand Rounds and at monthly Journal Clubs with the entire department.
  • Formal Courses: Residents participate in external courses including the Toronto Ophthalmology Residency Introductory Course (TORIC) (PGY1), the Halifax Ophthalmology Ethics Course (PGY2 or PGY3), the Sally Letson Symposium (all years) and review courses as selected by senior residents (PGY4 and PGY5). 
  • Clinical Exposure: uOttawa residents partake in clinical care covering a large area (Champlain LHIN) with coverage of Nunavut (Iqaluit and Baffin Island). This large catchment area results in a wide variety of cases, patient acuities and a large patient volume creating a superb learning environment. 
  • Surgical Teaching: Residents have early exposure to cataract surgery in PGY2 as part of the previously mentioned simulation courses in addition to their junior (PGY3) and senior cataract surgery rotations (PGY4).  Residents undergo formal surgical simulation as part of the Ophthalmic Surgical Skills Centre (OSSC) including the Introduction to Microsurgery Course (PGY2), Introduction to Cataract Surgery Course (PGY2), Intermediate Cataract Surgery Course (PGY3) and the Advanced Cataract Surgery Course (PGY4/5). The OSCC includes four full surgical stations (including surgical microscope, standard phaco machine, video recording capability) as well as a digital surgical simulator. 
  • Research: Residents have dedicated time roughly equivalent to one-half day a week distributed across PGY2 to PGY4 to conduct and complete research.  Residents also have access to the Department of Ophthalmology Research Fund (DORF) in order to support their research endeavours.  Residents are funded by the Department of Ophthalmology to attend conferences at which they present their scholarly endeavours. Staff ophthalmologists are very available and happy to mentor residents through their research. 
  • Environment & Call System: Residents train at three separate sites during their time in Ottawa. The University of Ottawa Eye Institute offers a centralized facility with access to a large volume of sub-specialists. Residents spend four to five months in PGY3 and one to two months in PGY5 at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) learning pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus surgery. Residents spend half of their PGY2 year at the Riverside Eye Care Centre (RECC) in a community ophthalmology setting and four months in PGY4 learning cataract surgery. uOttawa is proud to have a buddy call system where junior residents always have access to their senior resident on-call in addition to their staff surgeons to review cases.
  • Electives: Residents at uOttawa have the opportunity to visit and complete electives in Nunavut and India in their PGY4 or PGY5 year. In addition, many staff surgeons ask uOttawa senior residents to accompany them on eye missions through organizations including the EyeVan and Orbis International. Other elective opportunities are available and can be arranged as per the residents preferences and interest. 
  • Resident Wellness Program: uOttawa prides itself on having a close-knit team of residents. The recent creation of a Wellness Program for Residents prepares residents for incorporating wellness as a component of their clinical practice, and a basis for a life-long point of self-focus in building resiliency, and maintaining self-care as a physician. The Wellness Program consists of annually 3 expert-led interactive workshops on topics of the residents' choice, as resident retreat day, completion of wellness online modules, a wellness journal, and a resident-selective Wellness Lead with formal peer support training. Food is provided for all morning and evening teaching sessions. A GoodLife Gym is available at discounted rates for all residents located in The Ottawa Hospital General Campus where the University of Ottawa Eye Institute is located. A Resident Retreat is organized every year where residents are excused from clinical responsibilities dedicating time to formal team building; retreats in the past have included mini golfing, escape rooms and cooking classes.  Seasonal faculty gatherings are organized by the Program Director; past events have included the annual Inner-Tube Water Polo Staff versus Resident Party, Laser Tag and Bubble Soccer. Residents have a dedicated lounge space with access to personal lockers, couches, a refrigerator, a microwave, a tea kettle, two computers and a lunch table in which to socialize.
  • Mentorship: The Resident Mentorship Program formally pairs residents with a mentor with whom he or she can turn to for personal and professional guidance on an ongoing basis. 
  • Women Trainees in Ophthalmology Program: A series of quarterly meetings are organized with the purpose of exploring topics of interest to women trainees in ophthalmology. Both female residents and fellows are invited to participate. The goals is to provide support, networking opportunities and leadership opportunities to women trainees. A membership to The Raft Online Leadership Program for Women Physicians is provided for free by the program.


Program Curriculum

This residency program is for 5 years.

Program length of training does not exceed the Royal College or College of Family Physicians of Canada standard.

The University of Ottawa provides a five year comprehensive training in ophthalmology, leading to eligibility to write the Royal College specialty examinations in ophthalmology. Following the PGY-1 year, which is designed to give a broad-based clinical exposure, the residents start their four core years of ophthalmology. All residents are sent to a comprehensive basic science and introductory to clinical / surgical skills course in Toronto (TORIC) upon completing the PGY-1 core rotations for a 2 month period.

Throughout the four years, there is weekly dedicated formal lecture time and seminars which continue through the academic year. The department sponsors an active Visiting Professor Program attracting world-class clinicians and scientists. Journal clubs are held periodically with department faculty participating. Residents attend several conferences throughout the year and are encouraged to make presentations at national and international ophthalmic meetings. The curriculum encompassing four years of core ophthalmology training has dedicated research time, electives and in-depth exposure to subspecialties. The resident's progress is closely monitored in the clinics, operating room and teaching sessions and by practice oral examinations. All residents write the OKAP exam in the spring of each year.

PGY-1

The first year will provide a broad clinical background for residents entering ophthalmology. This will include 50 to 60% of the year in medicine, with exposure to general medicine, intensive care, ambulatory, ER, endocrinology, neuro-radiology, ENT, and neurology. Non-medicine rotations would include plastic surgery, ENT, paediatric emergency, and adult emergency. There is a four week elective block. In May, the residents spend two weeks in ophthalmology clinics, before going to the Toronto Ophthalmology Introductory Course (TORIC).



PGY-2

Second-year residents participate in both general and subspecialty clinics. During this year, residents are mainly based at the University of Ottawa Eye Institute and the Riverside Eye Care Center, with a a block in Ophthalmic Diagnostics. An intensive basic clinical skills course starts off the year in the summer of PGY2. During the Ophthalmic Diagnostics rotation there is dedicated time to learn contact lens fitting and management of the low vision patient.

 

PGY-3

The highlight of this year is an intensive four month rotation at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Paediatric Ophthalmology under the direction of paediatric ophthalmology and strabismology specialists. During this rotation, the residents have a weekly seminar series that covers all aspects of paediatric ophthalmology and strabismus. The surgical training is particularly rewarding and allows the residents to gain a comprehensive experience in routine strabismus procedures. The remaining rotations of the year are based at the University of Ottawa Eye Institute. Dedicated research time is available. During the remaining rotations, the residents will continue to acquire expertise in the general and sub-specialty clinics as well as develop their skills in cataract, glaucoma and retina-vitreous surgery.



PGY-4

In this year, time is devoted to further developing clinical skills in the general and subspecialty clinics while gaining further experience in cataract surgery, glaucoma, oculoplastics and retina-vitreous. The resident has the opportunity to serve as Chief resident and be responsible for the organization of the resident on-call schedule, resident clinics, O.R. and resident Journal Club participation. A community block allows residents to spend time in a community ophthalmology private practice.



PGY-5

The curriculum ensures that the resident has a solid grounding in general ophthalmology, has attained a high level of surgical expertise and is adequately prepared to take the Royal College examinations. In the final year, in addition to perfecting clinical and surgical skills in all areas of ophthalmology, time is available for research and electives as well as any personalized training that is needed. Block rotations during the final year allow the resident to function at an advanced level on different subspecialty services. These block rotations allow the resident to spend 2-3 blocks in each of the following subspecialty areas glaucoma, neuro-ophthalmology, retina, oculoplastics, cornea and anterior segment, including advanced cataract and refractive surgery.



Research

Residents actively participate in a research project each year and present their results at the annual departmental Research Day in May. Residents are encouraged and supported to present papers and posters at national and international meetings. There is dedicated research time for our residents in PGY-2 to PGY-4 years, to the equivalent of 1/2 day of protected research time per week. A dedicated research support staff and the Research Director are available to support REB applications and resident research projects. An introductory lecture to residents in PGY-1 introduces residents to the REB application process and writing a research proposal.




Training Sites

Resources

University of Ottawa Eye Institute, The Ottawa Hospital - General Campus
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario
Riverside Eye Care Center, The Ottawa Hospital - Riverside Campus
Baffin Program - Iqaluit, Nunavut
Precision Cornea Centre
Retina Centre of Ottawa

 


Additional Information

Additional resources include a state-of-the-art surgical simulation centre with wet lab. Residents have access to the Ottawa Hospital Medical Library and University of Ottawa Library with a comprehensive collection of ophthalmic and medical journals and textbooks in print and online. There is technology for recording and reviewing surgical cases. Computers and scanners are available for use in the resident's room. In PGY-1, each resident receives a complete set of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Basic and Clinical Science course manuals. Much of the program has been adapted to virtual teaching and incorporates clinical telemedicine in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and continues to be flexible in its teaching, nurturing and supportive of residents through the time of the pandemic.

Medical students will be applying to ophthalmology in the fall of their final year of medical school. If accepted, they will begin the program the following July with the first year providing a broad clinical experience with relevance to ophthalmology followed by four core years of residency training.

In the spring of 1992, the University of Ottawa Eye Institute, Ottawa General Hospital, opened its dedicated facility with 30,000 square feet devoted to ophthalmology. The institute provides clinical facilities for up to 13 geographical full-time staff, eight examination lanes dedicated for the resident clinics, two outpatient operating rooms, a complete line of lasers, the latest in imaging technologies (UBM, OCT, Orbscan, Pentacam, iTrace, Corneal confocal microscope, Zeiss in vitro laser confocal microscope, etc) and over 6,000 square feet of laboratory space. Currently there are two basic science and one visual impairment research laboratories with research ranging from molecular biology and genetics to electrodiagnostics. An additional clinical space houses exam lanes, an excimer laser and the University of Ottawa Eye Institute Refractive Surgery Centre and dedicated space for examining patients in clinical research trials. The University of Ottawa Eye Institute is known for being a world class tertiary subspecialty patient care facility, with innovation in research and excellence in clinical and surgical teaching.


FAQ

How many residents are in your program?

Currently, we have 15 residents.

 

What are your strengths? 

  • Early surgical exposure, beginning in the PGY-2 year, to ensure that the resident is extremely well trained surgically before entering the OR.
  • A large volume of didactic and interactive teaching with staff. High-quality teaching is done by staff not residents. Structured academic half days every Friday ensure all ophthalmic subspecialty topics from the AAO manuals are covered in completion twice during one's residency.
  • Daily morning subspecialty teaching clinics in neuro-ophthalmology, retina, uveitis and glaucoma to ensure junior residents hone early on their exam and clinical skills. These low-volume clinics facilitate one-on-one teaching allowing residents to interact directly with the comprehensive or subspecialist ophthalmologist.
  • High volume emergency afternoon clinics: there is nothing you would have not seen and be comfortable managing once you graduate from our program.
  • An elective designated for a rotation at the Baffin Program in Iqaluit. Senior residents serve as primary surgeons for minor oculoplastics procedures, lasers, injections.
  • A unique opportunity for a two-week elective at the Srikiran Eye Institute in India to learn small incision cataract surgery and see unusual cases
  • A resident rotation dedicated to ophthalmic diagnostics (B-scan, UBM, OCT, Orbscan, Pentacam, Corneal confocal microscope, Zeiss in vitro laser confocal microscope, etc)
  • An intense five-day course in eyelid, nasolacrimal and orbital anatomy involving a thorough dissection of a human cadaver orbits.
  • Opportunity for residents to participate in refractive surgery: a unique experience among ophthalmology programs
  • Dedicated time to conduct and complete research. Residents also have access to the Department of Ophthalmology Research Fund (DORF) in order to support their research endeavors
  • Each resident is formally paired with a mentor, with whom he or she can turn to for personal and professional guidance on an ongoing basis.

 

What are the didactic sessions like?

High-quality teaching is done by staff not residents. Structured academic half days every Friday morning ensure all ophthalmic subspecialty topics from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Manuals are covered in completion twice during one's residency. In addition, there are professor rounds twice a week and grand rounds every Wednesday.

 

Do you have a wetlab for residents to practice?

The University of Ottawa Ophthalmology Program introduces early surgical experience to its residents via the Surgical Simulation Centre to ensure that each resident is extremely well trained surgically before entering the OR. The Ophthalmology Surgical Simulation Centre (wet lab) offers the residents a place to learn and practice surgical procedures with the pig eye model developed by one of our staff physicians. In addition, the residents have access to the state-of-the-art EYESI simulator. 

Dr. Ralf Buhrmann, Director of the Ophthalmology Surgical Simulation Centre has developed great hands one training programs for the residents such as: Instruction to Microsurgery Course (basic suturing); Basic Cataract Surgery Course; and Advanced Cataract Surgery Course. 

 

Are residents required to perform research?

Residents actively participate in a research project each year and their results are presented at the annual departmental Research Day in May. Residents are encouraged and supported when they present papers and posters at national and international meetings. We have dedicated research time for our residents in PGY-2 to PGY-4 years, to the equivalent of 1/2 day per week.

 

What is the number of applications you receive each year?

The average number of applications received by our program in the last five years is between 51– 200. The average percentage of applicants offered interviews is 5 - 25 %.

 

Is there a forum to present issues affecting residents? 

The Post-Graduate Training Committee meets monthly to discuss all issues pertaining to the residency. Many changes are implemented regularly to address the changing needs and requirements of the residents. Key faculty and all residents are invited to participate.

 

Are the attendings approachable?

Absolutely. Each resident has an attending mentor. By the end of training, most residents have developed close relationship with their attendings.

 

Is there any time for electives? 

Our program offers an eight-week period of protected time for electives. In addition, during senior year, there is a two-week elective designated for a rotation at the Srikiran Eye Institute in India. This elective allows the resident to get exposed to small incision cataract surgery and offers an opportunity to see unusual cases.

 

How is life in Ottawa?

From city life to outdoor activities and a cultural atmosphere, Ottawa has something to offer to everyone. For urban living lovers, the Byward market, the Glebe, Elgin Street and Westboro are lively spots that offer vibrant city life options. For outdoor activities, about a 20-minute drive away from the city you will find numerous hiking/running/ /cycling trails in the Gatineau Park. Don’t forget also the world's largest skating rink in the historic Rideau Canal Skateway with a length of 7.8 kilometers. Culturally, the nation’s capital is the home of many galleries, theatres and museums. It is no surprise to us that Ottawa has been ranked as one of the best places to live in Canada.


Summary of changes

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